Why Does My Clit Hurt After Sex?

A sore clit after sex is not fun and can lead to some uncomfortable situations. Thankfully, most of the time the pain and itching can be alleviated with a little bit of knowledge and preparation.

The clitoris doesn’t produce lubricant like the vagina does, so it needs extra lubrication. Dryness can also cause friction, which leads to discomfort. Try using a water-based or silicone lubricant.

Tight clothing

For many women, slipping into tight clothing is a way to feel confident and beautiful. But skinny jeans that squeeze into every nook and cranny, tight miniskirts, skin-clinging dresses, or gym clothes that vacuum pack every inch of the body aren’t exactly healthy choices. These tight outfits can actually cause harm by preventing proper blood flow throughout the body. In the genital area, this can promote the growth of bacteria and fungi and lead to issues like yeast infections.

Tight clothing can also interfere with the lymphatic system, a crucial part of the immune system that helps protect the body from infection and aids in fat digestion and absorption. Experts from Kalon Spa in Bellevue explain that when your lymphatic system isn’t working properly, it can lead to clitoral pain and other unpleasant symptoms, such as acid reflux.

Tight clothing can also increase temperature and humidity in the genital area, which can make it easier for fungal infections to thrive. This can cause problems such as bad odors and even a vaginal yeast infection. If you suspect a yeast infection, it’s important to see a medical professional for treatment. In addition to a prescription medication, your doctor may recommend dietary changes and a yeast-fighting cleanse. This will help you restore a healthy balance in the vulva.

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Lack of lubrication

If you haven’t been using enough lubrication during foreplay or penetration, the friction resulting from this can make your clit feel sore after sex. Lubrication also helps prepare the vagina for penile entry and reduces irritation, so it’s important to add a good amount of it when you’re getting intimate with your partner.

In addition to a lack of lube, there could be an underlying medical condition that’s causing your pain. For instance, a yeast infection or sexually transmitted disease (STI) like chlamydia, gonorrhoea, or herpes can cause a painful clit. It’s important to see a doctor to check for these conditions and get the proper treatment.

Low estrogen can also cause clitoral pain, according to Dr. Jeffcoat. This is because low estrogen reduces the body’s ability to lubricate the vaginal canal, leading to unwanted friction during penetration and post-coital soreness. Many women experience this after pregnancy, breastfeeding, or while taking certain hormonal birth control methods.

To avoid clitoral pain during sex, use plenty of lubrication, engage in foreplay, and talk to your partner about what feels good and what doesn’t. In addition, you can try putting ice on the outside of your vulva to help soothe the pain and swelling. Just be careful not to put the ice inside your vagina, as this can irritate it further.

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An object under the clitoral hood

The glans clitoris (the part you can see, with the most nerve endings) is near the top of your vulva and the urethral opening (the hole you pee from). It’s covered by two flaps of skin that are called the clitoral hood.

A small area of the hood may be visible on your vulva, and it can look different on each person. It may cover all or some of your glans clitoris, and it can be as small as a pea or as big as your thumb. It’s a tiny piece of tissue, and it’s important to lubricate the whole area well.

But the hood is also prone to adhesions, which can lead to pain and reduced sensation during sexual activity. Those adhesions are caused by build-up of a sticky whitish substance called smegma, which is made from sweat, oil, skin cells, and vaginal secretions.

A doctor can perform a procedure to break down the adhesions and allow your glans clitoris to be properly stimulated during sexual activity. Until then, experiment with gentle pressure, slow movements, body parts like tongues or dildoes, and toys to see what feels best. If you’re having a hard time finding anything that does the trick, talk to your gynecologist about other health issues that might be contributing to your pain. These include vulvodynia, clitoral phimosis, and herpes.

An underlying medical condition

If the pain you feel after sex lasts for more than 24 hours and doesn’t subside, it could be a sign of an infection. It’s especially important to use protection, and talk to your partner if you think there may be an issue. Your doctor will be able to figure out what is causing your pain and provide treatment options.

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Inflammation of the clitoral hood may also be caused by irritation from chemicals in soaps, detergents, or hygiene products. These can irritate the sensitive nerves that run through your external genitals, and they can lead to itching or burning.

Another cause of clitoral pain is an underlying medical condition known as vulvodynia. This is a chronic pain issue that affects the vulva and external genitals, and it can flare up for no apparent reason. It’s usually due to the pudendal nerve, which runs from outside of your pelvis down to your penis and vagina, then branches out to other nerves.

Other causes of vulvodynia include menopause, pregnancy, or physical trauma to the area. It’s also possible that your pain is a result of scar tissue formed after a miscarriage or surgery down there. Finally, bacterial vaginosis (BV) or other infections can cause pain in the vulva and clitoral hood. Antibiotics from your doctor can usually clear these up.

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